What am I doing with a blog?

Awww…heck. I dunno.

quick thought April 6, 2007

Filed under: environment — himbly @ 2:06 pm

Not much time to go fully into this but predicting the weather next week and predicting how many degrees the climate will rise in a decade are different things that require different processes and that’s why you can’t really compare them.

UPDATE: I just wanted to post a link to where I discussed stuff like this before.

Which do you hate? the environment or the celebrity? April 3, 2007

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4 Responses to “quick thought”

  1. Mark Says:

    Not much time to go fully into this but carbon is among the weaker greenhouse gases, the earth was much warmer centuries ago, solar storms may have more of an effect on the environment than anything that humans do, and significantly more CO2 is emitted from volcanos and oceans than any human activity.

  2. himbly Says:

    Not much time to fully go into this, so try reading my post further down on the 928 peer reviewed articles written by researchers in the field.

  3. himbly Says:

    *sigh*…I just reread your comment.

    “…the earth was much warmer centuries ago…”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming

    No it wasn’t. It’s been much warmer since the Industrial Revolution.

    “…carbon is among the weaker greenhouse gases…”

    Carbon Dioxide, you mean…that’s a gas.

    ” may have more of an effect on the environment than anything that humans do, and significantly more CO2 is emitted from volcanos and oceans than any human activity.”

    928 peer reviewed and published articles written by various researchers in the field disagree with you. I wrote about it here:

    https://himbly.wordpress.com/2007/04/03/which-do-you-hate-the-environment-or-the-celebrity/

  4. Jaŋari Says:

    …Carbon is among the weaker greenhouse gases.

    True, but carbon dioxide is in massive concentrations in comparison to the other gasses. Methane is another, worse greenhouse gas, but its concentration is minimal (which is not to say that we are allowed to be flippant in emitting it, but you need to remember that it is more complicated than simply greenhouse gas = bad). Also, carbon dioxide’s properties differ to other greenhouse gasses like sulphur dioxide. Too much sulphur dioxide is also problematic, but a balance is crucial. Carbon is also long-lasting in comparison to other greenhouse gasses like water vapour, which absorbs more heat than carbon dioxide (which is why humid days feel hotter) but it’s very fleeting.

    the earth was much warmer centuries ago,

    Well, as Himbly pointed out, that’s not the case, at least not in the last few thousand years. Even so, the point is unnaturally fast global warming to which natural systems cannot adapt, especially given that it has an unnatural cause. If the causes were natural, then positive and negative feedbacks loops would probably be robust enough to sort it all out. The planet after all is a massive cybernetic system that has evolved its ecosystem over billions of years specifically to deal with natural changes in such things as ocean salinity, carbon concentration, global mean temperature, biomass, et cetera. We have effectively fucked it in under 200.

    solar storms may have more of an effect on the environment than anything that humans do

    Well, sure, we may all be wiped out in one fell swoop by a solar storm. What can you do? Should we say well, we may as well fuck it all up because something else can potentially do worse? That’d be like saying corporate crooks routinely get away with billions, therefore it’s okay for me to steal only a few million. It doesn’t wash.

    …and significantly more CO2 is emitted from volcanos and oceans than any human activity.

    Actually, most of the emitted material from volcanic events is sulphur dioxide, which has significantly different properties that carbon dioxide, most notably it reflects incoming solar radiation while carbon dioxide absorbs it then traps it in the atmosphere.

    As for oceans, they are should be full of phytoplankton, microscopic plants that absorb carbon dioxide. They are then a massive food source for the rest of the oceanic and estuarine food cycle (not chain; it’s circular). But, climate change is changing the fine balance of all interconnected ecosystems such that the oceans, which are massive carbon sinks, are becoming emitters of their stored carbon. Whether this is our fault or not (it is), it is definitely our problem.

    Don’t simplify the issue, Mark.


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